States mandating hpv vaccine

Rated 3.90/5 based on 819 customer reviews

Diane Harper was a leading expert responsible for the Phase II and Phase III safety and effectiveness studies which secured the approval of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines, Gardasil™ and Cervarix™. Harper also authored many of the published, scholarly papers about the vaccines.

She is now the latest in a long string of experts who are pressing the red alert on the devastating consequences and irrelevancy of these vaccines. Harper made her surprising confession at the 4th International Converence on Vaccination which took place in Reston, Virginia.

But when asked about the vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), most adults want parents to have the final say on whether their teen or pre-teen gets the shots. Only 45 percent of those polled would support state laws allowing the HPV vaccination without parental consent.

adults support laws that allow teens to get medical care for sexually transmitted infections without parental consent. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health recently asked a national sample of adults about allowing adolescents age 12 to 17 years old to receive the HPV vaccinations without parental consent.

At the time of writing, 44 girls are officially known to have died from these vaccines. Harper, the vaccine developer, claimed that she was speaking out, so that she might finally be able to sleep at night.The reported side effects include Guillian Barré Syndrome (paralysis lasting for years, or permanently — sometimes eventually causing suffocation), lupus, seizures, blood clots, and brain inflammation. ’About eight in every ten women who have been sexually active will have HPV at some stage of their life,’ Harper says.’Normally there are no “there is no demonstrated relationship between the condition being vaccinated for and the rare cancers that the vaccine might prevent, but it is marketed to do that nonetheless.While reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information provided, do not rely on this information without first checking with your local school or government. “But in contrast, 57 percent say they support teens being able to get medical care for prevention of sexually transmitted infections and 55 percent for treatment, all without parental consent,” says Sarah Clark, M. H., Associate Director of the Child Health Evaluation and Research (CHEAR) Unit at the University of Michigan and Associate Director of the National Poll on Children’s Health.

Leave a Reply